Added to the basket

Shopping Basket

Items: 0
Total: £0.00
View basketCheck out now

FAQs

  1. Why use Wire Mesh Fabrications?
  2. Are you able to manufacture meshes from materials other than carbon and stainless steels?
  3. What is welded mesh?
  4. How can I strengthen sheets of mesh?
  5. What are the advantages of stainless steel?
  6. What is stainless steel?
  7. How is Expanded Metal made?
  8. Which stainless steel type should I use?
  9. What is the difference between HDR and HD1?
  10. What is mesh count?
  11. How many types of Woven Mesh weaves are there?
  12. What are "warp" & "weft" wires?
  13. What is square mesh?
  14. What are end overhangs?
  15. What is the open area?
  16. How many finishes are available?
  17. What is the meaning of ERW?
  18. What is EXPERF?
  19. What is mesh fabric?
  20. What is lath and what does lathing mean?
  21. What is MD1?
  22. Is monel an alloy?
  23. What is nickel?
  24. How is Perforated Metal produced?
  25. What is the most common type of weave?
  26. Is raised mesh stronger than flattened mesh?
  27. What is Securilath?
  28. What are side overhangs?
  29. What is the difference between welded wire fabric and wire cloth?
  30. Are silver steel and bright steel the same thing?

1. Why use Wire Mesh Fabrications?

Answer: We have been manufacturing welded wire mesh and industrial wire products for over 35 years. We are able to develop products to your specification and manufacture in small quantities or long runs. We can supply all kinds of wirework including balustrades, baskets, trays and framed panels. Our team offers a wealth of industry knowledge acquired over the past 35 years and with pride in our craft we are able to focus this on meeting your requirements.

As suppliers to some of the strictest quality orientated industries such as chemical, pharmaceutical, pollution control and construction, you are assured in the knowledge that we are able to meet with even the highest of regulatory requirements and supply full material test certification.

2. Are you able to manufacture meshes from materials other than carbon and stainless steels?

Answer: In addition to carbon and standard stainless steels we are able to manufacture meshes from many other metals including:

SS310 – SS321 - Duplex – Incoloy – Hastelloy – Titanium – Inconel – Monel

3. What is welded mesh?

Answer: Welded Mesh is manufactured by laying cross-wires at 90º to the longitude wires and resistance welding at every inter-section. Not only does this create a strong and rigid product, but also offers a cost effective solution for a wide range of applications through many types of industries.

4. How can I strengthen sheets of mesh?

Answer: Strengthening can be achieved by the addition of frames and integral supports to mesh panels. Framing can also be added in order to achieve a ‘safe-edge’ when used in areas with high pedestrian traffic – e.g. balustrade infills and pedestrian barriers.

5. What are the advantages of stainless steel?

Answer: Stainless steel has been successfully used within the construction industry for over half a century. Its use has increased rapidly as the benefits of stainless steel over traditional materials have become more widely recognised.

Stainless steel offers excellent corrosion and high and low temperature resistance as well as non-magnetic properties and life-cycle costing benefits.

6. What is stainless steel?

Answer: Stainless steel is an alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium, it is also known as inox steel or inox from French inoxidable and is sometimes called corrosion-resistant steel or CRES. Stainless steel doe not stain, corrode or rust as easily as ordinary steel and is used where properties of steel resistance to corrosion is required.

7. How is Expanded Metal made?

Answer: Expanded metal is made by placing a metal plate in a press then stretching the metal, leaving diamond shaped voids surrounded by interlinked bars of the metal. It is made by simultaneously stretching and slitting the metal with one motion. Expanded metal is used in gratings, flooring, security fencing and even garden furniture and is often used for guarding machinery.

8. Which stainless steel type should I use?

Answer: Type 304
Otherwise known as 18 / 8 because of itscomposition (18% Chromium, 8% Nickel).
This is basic alloy most commonly used in internal applications and withstands exposure to the elements without rusting.
 
Type 316
Based on the above composition but strengthened by a 2% Molybdenum (mo) content.
 
Grade 316 has a greater resistance to pitting corrosion than other Stainless Steels, where sulphur bearing water or halogen salts, such as chlorines, are present.
 
Often found on chemical processing, medical and marine applications where its superior properties are utilised extensively

9. What is the difference between HDR and HD1?

Answer: HDR is a raised mesh Security lath ideal for use as a key for plaster and render finishes. HD1 however is used as a heavy weight option for security in walls, partitions and ceilings. Other options include MD1, a lighter option version than HD1 also used for security in walls, partitions and ceilings.

10. What is mesh count?

Answer: The mesh count is the number of apertures or wires per linear inch. Most meshes are square and will have the same mesh count in both warp and weft.

11. How many types of Woven Mesh weaves are there?

Answer: There are several types of woven mesh weaves, common types include:

PLAIN WEAVE

The most commonly used weave. Each weft wire passes alternately over and under each warp wire and each warp wire passes alternately over and under each weft wire. Warp and weft wire diameters are generally the same.

HOLLANDER WEAVE

While the warp wires remain straight, the weft wires are plain woven to lie as close as possible against each other in a linen weave, forming a dense strong material with small, irregular and twisting passageways that appear triangular when diagonally viewing to weave.

HOLLANDER TWILL WEAVE

Similar to plain weave, except that the weave is twilled, allowing a double layer of weft wires. There are no apertures in the true sense of the word as the filtrate follows a sinuous path through the depth of the wire cloth.

12. What are "warp" & "weft" wires?

Answer: The “warp” wires run across the length of a roll of mesh.

The “weft” wires run across the width of a roll of mesh.

13. What is square mesh?

Answer: Square mesh is an expanded metal mesh stretched more in order to produce a square hole pattern. It differs from normal expanded metal mesh is that its square aperture is its most important feature. A cost effective alternative to welded meshes which can be used for machine guards, balustrades, animal enclosures, infill panels etc.

14. What are end overhangs?

Answer: End overhangs are extensions of longitudinal wires beyond the centre line of outside transverse wires.

15. What is the open area?

Answer: The open area refers to expanded and perforated metal and is the proportion of the aperture expressed as a percentage of the whole area. Also called free area.

16. How many finishes are available?

Answer: Various finishes are available, from galvanising to electro-polishing. Below is a list of some examples:

Mild Steel: Hot-dip galvanising, powder coating, plastic/nylon coating

Stainless Steel: Acid-pickling (dull but clean finish), electro-polishing, chrome plating (bright and shiny)

17. What is the meaning of ERW?

Answer: ERW is the abbreviation for electrical resistance welding. Welding by the process of passing of an electric current through two metals.

18. What is EXPERF?

Answer: Experf is an alternative to perforated metal, referring to a range of expanded metal developed to emulate the circular pattern of perforated meal, considerably more cost effective and producing less waste material during manufacture. Its many uses include: room dividers, gates, filtration, acoustics, displays etc.

19. What is mesh fabric?

Answer: Mesh fabric is a material made from wire, helically wound and interwoven in order to provide a continuous mesh. A common term for reinforcing mesh.

20. What is lath and what does lathing mean?

Answer: Lath is a building material such as a sheet of metal used to provide a supporting framework for plaster, tiles etc.

Lathing is the process of building with lath.

21. What is MD1?

Answer: MD1 is a type of Securilath, a lighter option than HD1, used for security in walls, partitions and ceilings.

22. Is monel an alloy?

Answer: Monel is a nickel/copper alloy with a combination of strength and excellent resistance to sea water, acids etc. Stronger than pure nickel, monel alloys are resistant to corrosion by many agents, including rapidly flowing seawater.

23. What is nickel?

Answer: Nickel (Ni) is a silvery-white metal with a high melting point ( 1453 degrees centigrade) and possessing corrosion resistant properties.

24. How is Perforated Metal produced?

Answer: Perforated metal is produced by placing sheets of metal into a press and perforating round, square or various patterned holed into the metal. It is used in many applications including: balustrades, ventilation, filtration, internal or external cladding, screens etc.

25. What is the most common type of weave?

Answer: Plain weave is the most commonly used weave. Each weft wire passes alternately over and under each warp wire and each warp wire passes alternately over and under each weft wire. Warp and weft wire diameters are generally the same.

26. Is raised mesh stronger than flattened mesh?

Answer: Raised mesh is typically stronger than flattened mesh due to the structural strength gained from the mesh stands and bonds being set at an angle. Visibility through raised mesh will vary depending on the able at which the mesh is installed. Raised mesh provides excellent grip when used as a decking material.

27. What is Securilath?

Answer: Securilath is a range of reinforced security mesh for fixing to walls before plastering also known as lath.

28. What are side overhangs?

Answer: Side overhangs are extensions of transverse wire beyond centreline of outside longitudinal wires and which facilitate the welding to a frame or additional wires.

29. What is the difference between welded wire fabric and wire cloth?

Answer: Welded wire fabric is a series of longitudinal and transverse wires of various gauges, arranged at right angles to each other and WELDED at all points of intersection; used in concrete reinforcement.

Wire cloth is a term used to describe material WOVEN from metallic wires.

30. Are silver steel and bright steel the same thing?

Answer: Bright steel is also called silver steel and gets its name from its appearance due to the high carbon content.

Ecommerce Website by MintTwist